65: Excuses

65  fire-351185_1920 vonsi 46 pixabay

But Moses said, “Pardon your servant, Lord. Please send someone else.” Exodus 4:13 NIV

Before this last attempt to wriggle out of being God’s instrument, there are a number of others. Who am I to do this? Who shall I say sent me? What if they don’t believe me? What if they don’t believe me even with the miraculous signs? I can’t speak very well and am too slow. Finally, Moses runs out of excuses and says very honestly what he’s been trying to say for the whole encounter, actually Lord, I’d rather you sent someone else.

Don’t we all do this? Isn’t Moses so delightfully and frustratingly human? I admit, that, when attending charismatic churches, where they were very open to words and prophecies being shared, and when spaces were left for such things, I found myself sitting there wringing my hands and praying silently, please don’t ask me Lord, please don’t ask me. Some people are comfortable sharing and speaking publicly and some are terrified of it. Some missions sound frightening at first. But if the Lord is with us, we need not be afraid. I find he sends his peace where it really has no place to be if the calling is genuine, and we find we can walk into our destinies and callings unafraid, or at least, left without excuse!

For even though he runs out of ways to try to squirm free, the Lord is not angry with Moses until this last cowardly salvo. And even then, he has pre-empted Moses and the solution is on its way. Aaron is already coming to meet them. That means that God already knew all the objections Moses was going to have and had already countered them before they were spoken out. That should give us great encouragement! When we are the one who has noticed the strangeness of the burning bush that is not consumed by the fire, we are ready, and the Lord knows our fears and the doubts in our heart before he asks us to do something. Not only this, but he has already factored in the answers. We serve a mighty and caring God!

©Keren Dibbens-Wyatt

photo from Pixabay used under creative commons license.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s