Monthly Archives: July 2017

160. Purple (colour 5)

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Today’s piece is an excerpt from my book of devotions “Garden of God’s Heart” because I always think of azaleas when purple comes to mind.

AZALEA

“Like an alien welcomed onto English Victorian soil where most foreigners were spurned, your exotic blooms made their home here in the grey and green, shivering despite wearing your bright, crinkle-edged shawls. Whenever I turn a garden path and see you I am back at Manderley again, down by the Cornish shore, on high, blustery pathways looking out to Smugglers’ Bay, feeling mysterious and windswept.

Your Eastern hues confound us; saffron and amethyst, spice and depth that intoxicate and cheer those of us used to smaller, more subtle (more Anglican) displays of glory. We are learning to see this is not ostentation, but your own natural way, free from artfulness, not tightlipped or anxious like us, but careless, unconscious self-abandonment, true liberty despite edging a rectangle of manicured green; caged and domesticated, but free in your colour-saturated vivacity.”

 

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

Garden of God’s Heart is available on Amazon, Lulu, and the Barnes and Noble website.

 

159. Green (Colour 4)

green

As an artist, I can tell you that the one colour you never seem to have enough shades of, is green. The amount of different shades and tones of green in a landscape is astounding, as if God simply could not get enough of making them, but also because of the sheer number of leaves on the trees and blades in the grass, so that there is a myriad of angles and ways of catching and reflecting the light, or hiding in shadow. Creator God knows that one big mass of this colour needs to be broken up; given facets like a jewel to show its true beauty.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

158. Red (Colour 3)

red apple

Friend or foe? Sometimes colours call out a warning, and red is very often used as a sign of danger. Poisoned apple perhaps, or is it safe to eat? We breed our fruit now to make it look more appetising, and it can, if hurried on or waxed, or refrigerated for importation, seem a little false or unnatural. But red can also mean luscious and that goes for strawberries and lips too. Red is the colour of passion and of the blood that we carry unseen.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

157. Yellow (colour 2)

yellow

Small sun with petals flaring, golden circlet fit for a fairy queen, a bright burst of unexpected heaven. My wonder at seeing such magnificent primary colour is that we call the plant it comes from a weed, and that we can conceive of calling it a nuisance. Surely we should simply be amazed that it deigns to cross our path (or patio)?

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

156. Blue (Colour 1)

colour blue

St Francis said that after spending time in a meadow, he would have to come home and wring the sky out of his clothes. I imagine the Italian sky looked blue for a lot more of the time than it does here in the UK, but still, we get our fair share of the full range of blues, from the ocean of air that the summer swallows spiral in, to the palest shade on the horizon just before dawn.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

155. Red and Green (Aesthetics Conclusions)

red and green colours

We have seen over the past few weeks how beauty catches us unawares, how it is not always formulaic, but often inexplicably pleasing. The placement of a twig, the angle of a wing, the colour of a vase, the texture of fruit, there are unending variables in the science of aesthetics. The researchers tell us that the juxtaposition of red and green is particularly pleasing to the human mind, and we are coming on to look at colours as our next theme. A lot of products take advantage of such pleasure psychology, as does all the photo manipulation that goes on in advertising. But the truth is that there are very few things that we cannot, with some altering of perspective and a little metanoia, shifting of thought, find pleasing to the eye. Even the conventionally “ugly” person may have a smile that lights up the world, and just as we have to relearn our own loveliness, maybe we also need to reteach ourselves the loveliness of others.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017 Poem below, which I absolutely love © Galway Kinnell from his website http://galwaykinnell.com/books/poetry/body-rags/poem-1/

 

Saint Francis and the Sow by Galway Kinnell

 

The bud

stands for all things,

even those things that don’t flower,

for everything flowers, from within, of self-blessing;

though sometimes it is necessary

to reteach a thing its loveliness,

to put a hand on its brow

of the flower

and retell it in words and in touch

it is lovely

until it flowers again from within, of self-blessing;

as St. Francis

put his hand on the creased forehead

of the sow, and told her in words and in touch

blessings of earth on the sow, and the sow

began remembering all down her thick length,

from the earthen snout all the way

through the fodder and slops to the spiritual curl of

the tail,

from the hard spininess spiked out from the spine

down through the great broken heart

to the blue milken dreaminess spurting and shuddering

from the fourteen teats into the fourteen mouths sucking

and blowing beneath them:

the long, perfect loveliness of sow.

154. Rubbish and a Rose (Aesthetics 13)

rose and dustbin

Sometimes beauty catches us off-guard as we’ve already said, springing up in unexpected places. Here is our friend juxtaposition at work again, a rose blooming with a dustbin for background, reminding us of how the ordinary can be made sacred, as well as of the transitory nature of worldly beauty. Everything, however lovely, is one day going to end up on a compost heap, in a bin, in a tip, or reduced to ashes. Only then can resurrection begin to work its holy magic.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

153. Symmetry (Aesthetics 12)

Melly symmetry

Our brains are programmed to find symmetry pleasing, and one of the things that happens to a photograph of a model in a magazine is that his or her face will be photoshopped to look more symmetrical. If you make a face perfectly mapped from one side onto the other though, the outcome can be a little unnerving, and unnatural, and our brains pick up on this.

Supermodel Cindy Crawford was told she’d never make it as a model with a mole on her face. She refused to have it removed, and instead of holding back her career, it made her face instantly recognisable. Sometimes what society tells us is a flaw can be one of the very things that makes us more appealing. In Margaret Atwood’s dystopian novel, Oryx and Crake, the male hero bemoans the perfect bodies that are now genetically engineered, and hankers for an old lover who had “imperfections” that he knew and loved. Here is my cat’s fearful symmetry, not quite “perfect” but perfectly loveable to me. Idiosyncrasies are often pleasing to the eye and the heart, even though we might not be able to explain why.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017

152. Moon (Aesthetics 11)

moon

The moon is one of those things in life that is always aesthetically pleasing. Like flowers, it cannot go wrong when it comes to beauty. It is simple, silver and varying degrees of crescent or roundness. It never has a displeasing shape or shine. We are built to look up at it in wonder, as we cannot do with its sister the sun. I should think if you looked up things that have had most poems and songs written about them, that the moon would be pretty high on the list, and for good reason. Sat in its blue hammock here with a tinge of pink on the horizon, it is a recipe for a perfect sky.

text and photo © Keren Dibbens-Wyatt 2017